Wednesday, 3 October 2012

From architecture to cake

When I started gathering photos together for this blog post I thought the theme was going to be an architectural one about columns, Parisian columns. Then I got distracted, and the theme became one about perspective.

It all started a few weeks ago when I got off my bike at Place de la Madeleine and decided to take a closer look at the church. Initially it was built as a memorial to the 'Glory of the Great Army', commissioned by Napoleon in 1806. After the fall of Napoleon there was much debate about what the structure should be used as and it was only in 1848 when it was finally consecrated as a church. After locking up my bike I went into the church for the first time ever and quickly left, it is dark and gloomy and frankly felt a bit sinister.

I digress, the Madeleine church is designed in the style of ancient temple, and there are lots and lots of columns, as well as a fine visual demonstration of perspective.

My tendency to turn everything into an abstract pattern makes me take photos like this.



Rather fittingly, a few days later we were near La Bourse and walked past Rue des Colonnes.


This is a smallish road, aligned on either side with neo-greek columned arcades.


I love the creamy stone of these columns.



Here is a curved colonnade in the Parc Monceau.


Columns in the Palais Royal.


It was in the Palais Royal gardens that I became distracted and diverted my attention from columns to the perspective of long vertical forms. In this case trees.


Then gilded railings.


Curled railings, up by the Sacré Coeur.


Bollards (incidentally these bollards have been painted brown again).


Truncated columns in the Palais Royal, by night.


Finally, I became so distracted I started to see perspective in the bakery. I'll have the strawberry tart please.

1 comment:

  1. I would always also consider cake as far related to architecture, considering the details put into it. I am also very particular with details, the garden gazebos we made for the resort down South were also made out of fine details.

    ReplyDelete